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18:15 Fri

TLC From LD: Transformational Learning Communities #267

Fri, Nov 20, 18:15-19:45 JST

In this forum, a range of interactive presentations will critically explore the theme of transformative learning communities (TLCs), based on theories of transformative learning where learners reach fundamental shifts in their worldviews and actions through reflection. Presenters will focus on distinct groups of learners (high school students, university students, teachers, teacher trainees, and practitioner-researchers), with forum participants invited to discuss and later share their reflections about TLCs in Learning Learning, the Learner Development SIG's newsletter.

In this forum, a range of interactive presentations will critically explore the theme of transformative learning communities (TLCs), based on theories of transformative learning where learners reach fundamental shifts in their worldviews and actions through reflection. Presenters will focus on distinct groups of learners (high school students, university students, teachers, teacher trainees, and practitioner-researchers), with forum participants invited to discuss and later share their reflections about TLCs in Learning Learning, the Learner Development SIG's newsletter.

20:00 Fri

Learner Development SIG Annual General Meeting #833

Fri, Nov 20, 20:00-20:45 JST

This is going to be the AGM of Learner Development SIG in 2020. At the AGM, we will look through the 2020 Learner Development SIG Committee Review, and treasurer’s report for 2019-2020 and draft budget for 2021. Also, we will discuss and plan our SIG activities for 2021.

This is going to be the AGM of Learner Development SIG in 2020. At the AGM, we will look through the 2020 Learner Development SIG Committee Review, and treasurer’s report for 2019-2020 and draft budget for 2021. Also, we will discuss and plan our SIG activities for 2021.

10:45 Sat

A Paired-Skill Approach to CBI #549

Sat, Nov 21, 10:45-11:45 JST

Content-based instruction has gained popularity in the last few decades as a way to prepare students for English academic environments while building their communication skills. A paired-skill approach to this type of material builds both input and output skills, ensuring that students’ language development is well balanced. In this session, we’ll explore the benefits and challenges of content-based instruction and how to help students build up their language skills step-by-step.

Content-based instruction has gained popularity in the last few decades as a way to prepare students for English academic environments while building their communication skills. A paired-skill approach to this type of material builds both input and output skills, ensuring that students’ language development is well balanced. In this session, we’ll explore the benefits and challenges of content-based instruction and how to help students build up their language skills step-by-step.

11:55 Sat

Vulnerability and Positivity for Deeper Learning #461

This presentation reasons that collaboratively creating a classroom culture focused on personal authenticity and well-being should be the highest pedagogical priority. It then interactively introduces self-disclosure, team-building, and positive education activities that can be implemented in the classroom to foster openness, vulnerability, and curiosity, while in the pursuit of educational and personal well-being. The pedagogical efficacy of these activities is supported by students’ own accounts of their learning experiences.

This presentation reasons that collaboratively creating a classroom culture focused on personal authenticity and well-being should be the highest pedagogical priority. It then interactively introduces self-disclosure, team-building, and positive education activities that can be implemented in the classroom to foster openness, vulnerability, and curiosity, while in the pursuit of educational and personal well-being. The pedagogical efficacy of these activities is supported by students’ own accounts of their learning experiences.

13:25 Sat

Community via Authentic Content Language Immersion #394

If Teacher/Learner communication is to go beyond top-down instruction and evolve into an engaging, interactive exchange building language competence, a common ground of current subject matter to stimulate language use must be established. Utilising authentic video from the worlds of entertainment, news and factual programming, Lingua Attack provides this common ground, thus creating a true community of interest and relevance between teachers and learners ideal for flipped classroom teaching and similar pedagogical approaches.

If Teacher/Learner communication is to go beyond top-down instruction and evolve into an engaging, interactive exchange building language competence, a common ground of current subject matter to stimulate language use must be established. Utilising authentic video from the worlds of entertainment, news and factual programming, Lingua Attack provides this common ground, thus creating a true community of interest and relevance between teachers and learners ideal for flipped classroom teaching and similar pedagogical approaches.

14:35 Sat

CLIL and Multiliteracies #763

After the digital turn, sometime around the 21st century, literacy theorists argue that spatial, gestural, and materialized elements have important roles for comprehending literal meaning. Combining all these, scholars term the new literacy as multiliteracies (The New London Group, 1996, Mills, 2015). This presentation examines a classroom-oriented research project, in which students learned abstract concepts through excerpts of TED Talks. The presenter will examine possible ways to integrate multiliteracies into CLIL methodology for university students.

After the digital turn, sometime around the 21st century, literacy theorists argue that spatial, gestural, and materialized elements have important roles for comprehending literal meaning. Combining all these, scholars term the new literacy as multiliteracies (The New London Group, 1996, Mills, 2015). This presentation examines a classroom-oriented research project, in which students learned abstract concepts through excerpts of TED Talks. The presenter will examine possible ways to integrate multiliteracies into CLIL methodology for university students.

16:45 Sat

Acquisition of Difficult English Prepositions #764

This presentation examines learners’ understanding and development of difficult prepositional usages of at, from, in, on, and to. Results indicate semantic complexity and metacognitive understanding of these prepositions are the main obstacles for learners to overcome in order to enhance their learning. This ongoing investigation illustrates that the elicitation of grammatical structures through the development and implementation of task-based learning tasks provides an effective strategy to support learners’ language development, confidence, and self-efficacy.

This presentation examines learners’ understanding and development of difficult prepositional usages of at, from, in, on, and to. Results indicate semantic complexity and metacognitive understanding of these prepositions are the main obstacles for learners to overcome in order to enhance their learning. This ongoing investigation illustrates that the elicitation of grammatical structures through the development and implementation of task-based learning tasks provides an effective strategy to support learners’ language development, confidence, and self-efficacy.

17:20 Sat

Four Steps to Realize an English Presentation #460

Twelve university students made an English presentation to introduce various puppet theaters around the world at an international conference. In order to realize this English presentation, the teacher employed Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) and introduced four steps for the students. This presentation reviews the process of these four steps and examines the changes in the students’ attitudes, behaviors and awareness.

Twelve university students made an English presentation to introduce various puppet theaters around the world at an international conference. In order to realize this English presentation, the teacher employed Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) and introduced four steps for the students. This presentation reviews the process of these four steps and examines the changes in the students’ attitudes, behaviors and awareness.

18:30 Sat

Student-Led Research in the University Classroom #721

This presentation will focus on a novel approach to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) in the university classroom setting by having students produce and present original research. This module details an effective approach to introducing original research to ESL students from both a qualitative and quantitative approach by utilizing questionnaires. The goal of the semester-long module is to familiarize students with the central concepts of questionnaire research, academic research papers, and academic presentation skills.

This presentation will focus on a novel approach to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) in the university classroom setting by having students produce and present original research. This module details an effective approach to introducing original research to ESL students from both a qualitative and quantitative approach by utilizing questionnaires. The goal of the semester-long module is to familiarize students with the central concepts of questionnaire research, academic research papers, and academic presentation skills.

09:30 Sun

Establishing EMI Programs in Japanese Universities #712

This presentation discusses the creation of new English as a medium of instruction (EMI) programs in Japan’s universities. Challenges arise from different levels of student language ability. One approach is to create different levels of EMI class, set according to English language ability. Another is to introduce a student assistant (SA) scheme in which English-speaking students are assigned to help other students. Team teaching with content and language teachers is another method to be discussed.

This presentation discusses the creation of new English as a medium of instruction (EMI) programs in Japan’s universities. Challenges arise from different levels of student language ability. One approach is to create different levels of EMI class, set according to English language ability. Another is to introduce a student assistant (SA) scheme in which English-speaking students are assigned to help other students. Team teaching with content and language teachers is another method to be discussed.

10:45 Sun

A Needs-Based University Media Literacy Course #480

Due to the lack of empirical data arguing the effectiveness of information and communication technology (ICT) and media literacy education at Japanese secondary schools, there is a need to build these essential skills at university. This presentation begins by discussing the current state of ICT and media literacy education in Japan. It then outlines a media literacy course designed at a small private university in Japan based on a needs analysis survey.

Due to the lack of empirical data arguing the effectiveness of information and communication technology (ICT) and media literacy education at Japanese secondary schools, there is a need to build these essential skills at university. This presentation begins by discussing the current state of ICT and media literacy education in Japan. It then outlines a media literacy course designed at a small private university in Japan based on a needs analysis survey.

11:20 Sun

Challenges Facing Teachers of EMI Seminars #731

With the ever increasing internationalisation of Japanese universities, more foreign instructors are being entrusted with teaching seminars (the “zemi”). These teachers often find themselves in social, pastoral, and mentoring roles that go beyond their usual academic duties. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative interview study of such teachers and aims to provide insights and support for those who have recently begun teaching zemi classes.

With the ever increasing internationalisation of Japanese universities, more foreign instructors are being entrusted with teaching seminars (the “zemi”). These teachers often find themselves in social, pastoral, and mentoring roles that go beyond their usual academic duties. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative interview study of such teachers and aims to provide insights and support for those who have recently begun teaching zemi classes.

11:55 Sun

How Student Success Inspired Curricular Change #492

Student success at National Model United Nations (NMUN) competitions over several years has led to curricular change at one private university in Japan. Over several years, students prepared to participate in NMUN conferences through seven months of student-led but teacher-supported meetings, practice, and study. However, in April 2020, the university accepted a proposal for an international relations course to be taught mainly to English language majors. This presentation looks at how it all manifested.

Student success at National Model United Nations (NMUN) competitions over several years has led to curricular change at one private university in Japan. Over several years, students prepared to participate in NMUN conferences through seven months of student-led but teacher-supported meetings, practice, and study. However, in April 2020, the university accepted a proposal for an international relations course to be taught mainly to English language majors. This presentation looks at how it all manifested.

12:50 Sun

TBLT Online Using Moodle and Zoom #550

This paper presents insights gained through the online implementation of two task-based courses taught in spring 2020. One course was on genre reading (detective fiction) and the other on workplace communication. Both represent a “strong” approach to TBLT and assessment. The courses were delivered synchronously via Zoom and asynchronously using Moodle. In each case a high number of platform-related successes and some limitations were identified. Suggestions for developing future online TBLT courses will be provided.

This paper presents insights gained through the online implementation of two task-based courses taught in spring 2020. One course was on genre reading (detective fiction) and the other on workplace communication. Both represent a “strong” approach to TBLT and assessment. The courses were delivered synchronously via Zoom and asynchronously using Moodle. In each case a high number of platform-related successes and some limitations were identified. Suggestions for developing future online TBLT courses will be provided.

14:00 Sun

Effects of Task Repetition in Presentation Skills #613

The presenter will show how the EFL learners’ oral performances were affected by task repetition. Sixty college students were divided into two groups of 30. One group repeated the same task in which they were required to perform the presentations on the same topic. The other group repeated the same task but they were required to give the presentations on a different topic. The presenter will show the results and discuss the pedagogical implications.

The presenter will show how the EFL learners’ oral performances were affected by task repetition. Sixty college students were divided into two groups of 30. One group repeated the same task in which they were required to perform the presentations on the same topic. The other group repeated the same task but they were required to give the presentations on a different topic. The presenter will show the results and discuss the pedagogical implications.

14:35 Sun

Integrating TBLT and Applied Linguistics Content #694

Teaching SLA theory to preservice language teachers at the university level is a struggle due to a lack of appropriate materials for limited proficiency students. The speaker will share his experience crafting task-based language learning (TBLT) materials for an applied linguistics curriculum for preservice university students in Japan. Level-appropriate content and associated task-based activities that integrate pedagogical theory, classroom practice, and linguistic fluency will be introduced.

Teaching SLA theory to preservice language teachers at the university level is a struggle due to a lack of appropriate materials for limited proficiency students. The speaker will share his experience crafting task-based language learning (TBLT) materials for an applied linguistics curriculum for preservice university students in Japan. Level-appropriate content and associated task-based activities that integrate pedagogical theory, classroom practice, and linguistic fluency will be introduced.

16:45 Sun

A Universal Rubric for Task Outcome Assessment #363

Sun, Nov 22, 16:45-17:45 JST

This workshop introduces a universal assessment rubric for teachers to easily grade speaking, writing, or mixed-skills task performance in the classroom. The tool conforms to TBLT assessment principles, has high validity and inter-rater reliability, and allows for instructional feedback. It is compatible with all language descriptor systems, and can be applied to a wide range of communicative tasks at any level. Participants will receive a copy of the tool and practical training in its use.

This workshop introduces a universal assessment rubric for teachers to easily grade speaking, writing, or mixed-skills task performance in the classroom. The tool conforms to TBLT assessment principles, has high validity and inter-rater reliability, and allows for instructional feedback. It is compatible with all language descriptor systems, and can be applied to a wide range of communicative tasks at any level. Participants will receive a copy of the tool and practical training in its use.

17:55 Sun

Developing Language Skills Through Movie Making #692

Japanese EFL learners face challenges in speaking fluent and accurate English due to various cognitive, linguistic and affective factors. This paper reports on an investigation of how language skills could be further developed through a movie-making project in English.

Japanese EFL learners face challenges in speaking fluent and accurate English due to various cognitive, linguistic and affective factors. This paper reports on an investigation of how language skills could be further developed through a movie-making project in English.

18:35 Sun

Yo, You Can't Google This!—Is PBL Right for You? #475

Hirosaki University subsidizes international project-based learning (PBL). Since 2017, we've accompanied four PBL groups to Hawaii Island. Providing unique, experiential, domestic and international content has proven less challenging than selecting balanced, mindful groups. Who do we choose? How do we get a generation with information at their fingertips to put their minds and bodies into live projects? We'll share our process and invite participants to brainstorm improvements to better serve future cohorts.

Hirosaki University subsidizes international project-based learning (PBL). Since 2017, we've accompanied four PBL groups to Hawaii Island. Providing unique, experiential, domestic and international content has proven less challenging than selecting balanced, mindful groups. Who do we choose? How do we get a generation with information at their fingertips to put their minds and bodies into live projects? We'll share our process and invite participants to brainstorm improvements to better serve future cohorts.

09:30 Mon

Communicative Grammar Instruction Through GCR #445

This workshop will highlight the effectiveness of grammar consciousness-raising (GCR) tasks in English lessons in Japanese high schools. The presenter will explain effective integration of grammar instruction and communication activities through GCR tasks. This technique enabled learners to use grammatical items in actual communication. Additionally, it helped them gain confidence in grammar knowledge and actual use in communication simultaneously. Materials and students’ feedback will be shared, and participants will explore how to teach grammar communicatively.

This workshop will highlight the effectiveness of grammar consciousness-raising (GCR) tasks in English lessons in Japanese high schools. The presenter will explain effective integration of grammar instruction and communication activities through GCR tasks. This technique enabled learners to use grammatical items in actual communication. Additionally, it helped them gain confidence in grammar knowledge and actual use in communication simultaneously. Materials and students’ feedback will be shared, and participants will explore how to teach grammar communicatively.

10:05 Mon

Learners Discussing Errors in Their Oral Output #711

This study had learners revise transcripts of their oral production for linguistic accuracy, and compare their revisions to those made by the teacher. Investigated were the effects on learning of revised forms of (a) self-noticing and revision, and (b) extent of learner discussion of a revision. Only very modest, albeit statistically significant, effects of the above on learning outcomes were found; raising doubts whether this technique justifies the time and effort required for its use.

This study had learners revise transcripts of their oral production for linguistic accuracy, and compare their revisions to those made by the teacher. Investigated were the effects on learning of revised forms of (a) self-noticing and revision, and (b) extent of learner discussion of a revision. Only very modest, albeit statistically significant, effects of the above on learning outcomes were found; raising doubts whether this technique justifies the time and effort required for its use.

11:55 Mon

Beyond Four Skills: Planning Based on Four Strands #662

Many language-program curricula are organized according to the four skills. However, Nation’s (2013) four-strands model (fluency practice, meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, language-focused learning) offers a different, more comprehensive approach. This presentation introduces a project which applied J.D. Brown’s curriculum design process, using Nation’s four strands as the underlying principle. The presenters discuss integrating CLIL, EAP, extensive reading, and other aspects under the four-strands principle, with particular attention on a stand-alone class for fluency development.

Many language-program curricula are organized according to the four skills. However, Nation’s (2013) four-strands model (fluency practice, meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, language-focused learning) offers a different, more comprehensive approach. This presentation introduces a project which applied J.D. Brown’s curriculum design process, using Nation’s four strands as the underlying principle. The presenters discuss integrating CLIL, EAP, extensive reading, and other aspects under the four-strands principle, with particular attention on a stand-alone class for fluency development.